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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 84

Direct-acting antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C


1 KMT Primary Care Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Nis, Nis, Serbia

Date of Submission20-Mar-2019
Date of Decision14-Nov-2019
Date of Acceptance14-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication20-Apr-2020

Correspondence Address:
Sora Yaasri
KMT Primary Care Center, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjamf.sjamf_26_19

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How to cite this article:
Yaasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Direct-acting antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Sci J Al-Azhar Med Fac Girls 2020;4:84

How to cite this URL:
Yaasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Direct-acting antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Sci J Al-Azhar Med Fac Girls [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 May 30];4:84. Available from: http://www.sjamf.eg.net/text.asp?2020/4/1/84/282863



Dear Editor, we read the publication on ‘Impact of direct-acting antiviral therapy in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C and liver cirrhosis’ with great interest [1]. Elnadry et al. [1] concluded that ‘Oral regimens of DAAs are effective in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection even in patients with liver cirrhosis, leading to improvements in liver functions.’ It is no doubt that hepatitis C virus is an important viral infection that can induce unwanted complications including cancer. Antiviral treatment for this infection is necessary and is usually recommended. Regarding direct-acting antivirals treatment, it is accepted for its effectiveness and safety. However, there should be additional considerations in case that there are any concomitant infections. Indeed, there are several possible common coinfections for hepatitis C virus infections including hepatitis B virus infection, HIV virus infection, and tuberculosis. In some complicated cases, a patient might have all mentioned diseases and require multiple drugs for management [2],[3]. The specific drugs for each medical disorder are required and the important problem in that case is the possible drug–drug interaction that might result in unwanted adverse effects. In the present report by Elnadry and colleagues, the possible concomitant medical problem is not well studied and this is an interesting issue for further additional research on the use of direct-acting antivirals.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Elnadry MH, Abdel-Aziz SA, Ghareb M, Ahamad AA, Abu-Mohammed NM, Tayel MM. Impact of direct-acting antiviral therapy in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C and liver cirrhosis. Sci J Al-Azhar Med Fac Girls 2018; 2:181–188.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Dolan K, Wirtz AL, Moazen B, Ndeffo-Mbah M, Galvani A, Kinner SA et al. Global burden of HIV, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis in prisoners and detainees. Lancet 2016; 388:1089–1102.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Custer SS. Management of coinfections in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. Nurs Clin North Am 2018; 53:83–96.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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