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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 797

Study of the association between obesity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and asthma in preschool children


Date of Submission04-Jun-2019
Date of Decision13-Oct-2019
Date of Acceptance14-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication10-Feb-2020

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjamf.sjamf_54_19

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How to cite this article:
. Study of the association between obesity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and asthma in preschool children. Sci J Al-Azhar Med Fac Girls 2019;3:797

How to cite this URL:
. Study of the association between obesity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and asthma in preschool children. Sci J Al-Azhar Med Fac Girls [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Feb 29];3:797. Available from: http://www.sjamf.eg.net/text.asp?2019/3/3/797/278034



Sir,

I read the interesting study by El-Zayat et al. [1] published in the January–April 2019 issue of The Scientific Journal of Al-Azhar Medical Faculty, Girls. They studied the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in a group of Egyptian obese asthmatic preschool children and determined some risk factors for simple obesity and asthma. They found that the prevalence of obese asthmatic children of high socioeconomic standard was higher (63.3%) compared with nonobese asthmatic children (26.7%) and controls (16.7%). The prevalence of asthmatic patients living in urban areas (66.7%) was higher than those living in rural areas (33.3%). Children who received artificial feeding were more frequent in asthmatic obese (66.7%) compared with asthmatic nonobese (46.7%) and controls (23.3%). Moreover, blood plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 had a statistically significant increase in asthmatic obese (1549.24±340.54 pg/ml) compared with asthmatic nonobese (217.96±260.0 pg/ml) and controls (160.23±56.54 pg/ml) [1]. I presume that these results must be cautiously taken due to the presence of the following methodological limitation. In the methodology, El-Zayat et al. [1] mentioned that they used the WHO growth charts to define obesity. It is explicit that in the field of clinical researches, there are numerous growth charts to measure various anthropometric components in children. These include WHO charts, Center for Disease Control charts, and country-specific charts. Studies have shown that the use of country-specific growth charts could describe the growth of children more precisely in comparison with other charts [2],[3]. To my knowledge, national Egyptian growth charts were constructed in 2002 to evaluate the growth of children in the researches and clinical settings [4]. Importantly, significant differences were noticed between sexes regarding the growth of children on using the Egyptian growth charts compared with other charts [5]. I wonder why El-Zayat et al. [1] referred to the WHO charts instead of the Egyptian charts in the study methodology. I presume that if national charts were used, more precise results might be obtained.

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Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
El-Zayat TH, Mohamed AG, Mokhtar ER, Fathy WA. Study of the association between obesity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and asthma in preschool children. Sci J Al-Azhar Med Fac Girls 2019; 3:142–149.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Ziegler EE, Nelson SE. The WHO growth standards: strengths and limitations. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2012; 15:298–302.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Natale V, Rajagopalan A. Worldwide variation in human growth and the World Health Organization growth standards: a systematic review. BMJ Open 2014; 4:e003735.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Egyptian Growth charts. Diabetic Endocrine & Metabolic Pediatric unit and national research center – Cairo, in collaboration with Wight State University. School of Medicine Department of Community Health Life Span. Health Research Center. 2002. Available at: http://dempuegypt.blogspot.com.eg/2008_11_01_archive.html  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Mohammad HA, Ahmed ES, GadAllah MA, Monazea EM. Underweight and short stature among Upper Egypt school children using national and international growth charts. IOSR J Nurs Health Sci 2016; 5:87–92.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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